GENERAL PRACTICE

Please find below the poster abstracts for this specialty.

Use the links below to view the poster, along with the entire Virtual Poster Gallery!

Poster 8

 

Bisphosphonate Prescribing Trends and Assessment of Treatment Outcomes

Eleanor Dewhurst, Jishoden Padiachy, Omair Shabir | University of Warwick

 

Background
This audit set out to determine the compliance of bisphosphonate prescribing trends within Kennoway Medical Group with NHS Fife’s Osteoporosis Management Policy, with a retrospective focus on fracture outcomes amongst patients actively receiving bisphosphonate treatment.
 

Methods
Kennoway Medical Group requested an audit of their bisphosphonate prescribing practice to determine whether this is concordant with local policy. The standards of the audit are based on NHS Fife’s Osteoporosis Management Policy. Egton Medical Information System (EMIS) and Docman were used to obtain the data for 58 patients on bisphosphonate treatment. Microsoft Excel was used for composition of graphs and statistical analysis involving the calculation of means, standard deviation, and an unpaired T-test. Data were compared to the initial standards. 
 

Results
A suboptimal compliance rate (67%) of bisphosphonate prescribing was identified, along with findings of age-specific fracture risks in patients receiving bisphosphonate treatment. 
 

Key Messages
Recommendations are proposed to Kennoway Medical Group for quality improvement. Other practices should consider implementing similar changes.

 

Poster 9

 

Video Consultations Uncut: A Systematic Review of the Benefits and Limitations Regarding Use as an Alternative to Face-to-Face Consultations in UK General Practice

Mihari de Soysa | University of Warwick

 

Background
Within general practice the term video consultations (VC) is often met with apprehension. However due to the recent surge in use of VC, we want to explore the potential benefits and limitations in order to identify whether it is a viable alternative to face-to-face consultations (FTFC).
 
Methods
This review was conducted by searching medical databases for existing literature related to video consultations in general practice. Papers were carefully screened, and data extracted based on pre-determined themes.
 

Results
Response to the use of VC was mixed with FTFC generally being favoured. However, many identified that VC were convenient for working patients, those with children and was also time saving. VC were also considered to be more beneficial than telephone consultations due to the visual aspect provided. Concerns were identified regarding workload and problems with technology and data security.
 
Key Messages
Many patients are happy to use VC as an alternative to FTFC. It has been identified as improving accessibility to primary care however uncertainty regarding the technology and its security has also been highlighted. To combat this, we are already seeing publication of clearer guidelines regarding how and when to use VC. However, we recommend supplementing this with comprehensive guidelines regarding patient safety as well as thorough training on set-up and use. As use becomes more prevalent, further research will also be important.

 

Poster 10

 

Experiences of West Midland Funeral Directors in arranging for GPs to complete Cremation Form 4

Jordan Moss, John MacArtney | University of Warwick

 

Background
When someone dies in the community, the registered General Practitioner (GP) must physically examine the deceased and complete Cremation Form 4 to allow a cremation. This work is not paid for by the NHS and may come second to increasing NHS workload. Financial cost is often a factor for families in choice of Funeral Director, leading to potential difficulties when the GP is located some distance from the Funeral Home. The Funeral Director acts as an intermediary in arranging for the GP to complete the cremation paperwork to enable cremation, yet their role has been understudied.
 
Methods
We interviewed seven Funeral Directors from the West Midlands using semi-structured interviews to collect qualitative data. Participants were recruited by email and five were interviewed face-to-face and two by email. Thematic analysis was conducted on interview transcripts using NVivo v.10.
 
Results
Participants told us of the consequences the current system has and its impact on GPs, Funeral Directors and the bereaved. Participants reported that GPs were sometimes too busy to attend to complete Cremation Form 4 in good time, leading to delays to funeral plans. It was reported that Funeral Directors had to act to facilitate the physical examination, sometimes by moving the deceased. Funeral Directors reported considerable distress from the bereaved when they became aware of this. COVID-19 has led to changes to the administration of the deceased and we hope this work will increase our knowledge of this area.
 
Key Messages
This research highlights a conflict between the duty the GP has to their living and deceased patients and the way the cremation paperwork system fails to work effectively for families in the experience of the Funeral Directors we interviewed.

 

Poster 11

 

Targeted Encouragement of GP Consultations for Possible Cancer Symptoms: Randomised Controlled Trial

Jean-Pierre Laake | University of Warwick

 

Background

For some common cancers, survival is lower in the UK than in other comparable high-income countries and there are geographic and socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival. Increased mortality is believed to be largely due to delays in diagnosis. Patient factors which may contribute towards delayed help-seeking include lower awareness of cancer symptoms, negative beliefs about cancer and a reluctance to “waste the doctor’s time”. This trial assessed the effectiveness of a targeted postal intervention, promoting awareness of cancer symptoms and help-seeking, on patient consultation rates.
 
Methods

1,513 patients aged 50-84 years who had not consulted their GP in the last 12 months and who had at least two other risk factors for late presentation with cancer were individually randomised to receive either the postal intervention or not. The intervention included a leaflet highlighting six ‘red flag’ cancer symptoms, alongside a letter from the patients’ GP encouraging help-seeking. The primary outcome measure was the number of consultations at the practice in the subsequent 6 months.
 
Results

Outcome data was available for 1,454 patients, there was a significantly higher rate of consultation in the intervention arm (RR=1.40, 95% CI 1.11-1.77, p=0.004), 436 consultations versus 335 in the control arm. There was, however, no difference in the numbers of persons consulting their general practitioner, with 165 in each arm.
 
Key Messages

Targeted interventions such as this have the potential to alter patient behaviour. There is a need to develop interventions which can be more effective at engaging the broader less engaged population with primary care services.